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Errol Lincoln Uys (pronounced 'Ace') was ten when he wrote Revenge, a novella penned on the back of worthless stock certificates tossed out by his mother. After high school, he worked as a law clerk before becoming a reporter on the  Johannesburg Star. His next job was as editor of the Cape Town edition of Post newspaper, then South Africa's biggest weekly serving the African and mixed-race population.

Moving to London, he was chief reporter for the South East London Mercury, before joining Reader's Digest in England. The magazine sent him back to Africa, where he founded the first South African editorial office, becoming editor-in-chief in 1972.

Five years later, he immigrated to the United States with his family, joining the Digest's world headquarters as a senior international editor. In 1977, the Digest assigned him to work with James A. Michener on his South African novel, The Covenant, a controversial collaboration covered in Working with James Michener.

Uys is the author of the best-selling historical novel, Brazil. Uys has also written the non-fiction book, Riding the Rails: Teenagers on the Move During the Great Depression.

Now an American citizen, Uys lives in Dorchester, Boston.

Treasure hunter, Thomas Lloys-Ellis: In search of King Lobengula's millions

Thomas Wallinger Lloys-Ellis, Johannesburg pioneer, Orange Grove Hotel
Thomas Wallinger Lloys-Ellis, Johannesburg pioneer and tresure hunter, at Orange Grove Hotel 
Thomas led four expeditions in search of the lost millions of King Lobengula of Zimbabwe

Buried treasure of King Lobengula of Zimbabwe

Seven Lost Trails of Africa - Hedley Chilvers
Seven Lost Trails of Africa - Hedley Chilvers
Thomas Wallinger Lloys-Ellis
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Buried millions of Lobengula - Hedley Chilvers
Buried millions of Lobengula - Hedley Chilvers
Lobengula's diamonds, gold and sovereigns - Hedley Chilvers
Lobengula's diamonds, gold and sovereigns
Discipline of Lobengula - Hedley Chilvers
Discipline of Lobengula - Hedley Chilvers
The last stand of the Shangani patrol annihilated when pursuing King Lobengula
The last stand of the Shangani patrol annihilated when pursuing King Lobengula
How Lobengula hid his treasure - Hedley Chilvers
How Lobengula hid his treasure - Hedley Chilvers
Decline and fall of the Matabele Empire - Hedley Chilvers
Decline and fall of the Matabele Empire - Hedley Chilvers
John Jacobs and King Lobengula - Hedley Chilvers
John Jacobs and King Lobengula - Hedley Chilvers
"Lobengula, a great man stern in his judgements" - Jacobs
Lloys-Ellis establishes a base camp on Limpopo banks
Lloys-Ellis establishes a base camp on Limpopo banks
Wild dogs of the African veld
Consulting a witch doctor
Consulting a witch doctor
Trteasure hunt along tyhe Mozambican border
Trteasure hunt along tyhe Mozambican border
The Commisioner's spectacles and the lion
The Commisioner's spectacles and the lion.
Second and third expeditions of Lloys-Ellis
Second and third expeditions of Lloys-Ellis
Others search for Lobengula's treasure
Others search for Lobengula's treasure
Map - Search for Lobengula's treasure
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Lobengula's treasure - 1929 expedition
Lobengula's treasure - 1929 expedition
Tommy Lloys-Ellis watches as the witchdoctor throws the bones
Tommy Lloys-Ellis watches as the witchdoctor throws the bones
Thomas Lloys-Ellis - A
Thomas Lloys-Ellis - A "warrior" on the banks of the Limpopo River - 1928
Treasure hunter Thomas Lloys Ellis hams it up!
Treasure hunter Thomas Lloys Ellis hams it up!

REVENGE - Jottings for a novella by a 10-year-old


Revenge - Jottings for a  novella by 10-year-old Errol Lincoln Uys
Revenge - Jottings for a novella by 10-year-old Errol Lincoln Uys

It was a dull day when Jan de Cilliers rode onto his land. He had just come from Graaff-Reinet and had his wagon loaded with supplies for his farm. As he rode along the rough road, he began to get a nervous feeling. Then he thought, "Was it the Kaffirs and had they attacked his farm?" He began to ride faster, but it was not necessary for he saw the smoke curling up like a savage beast and disappearing into the sky. He did not want to see the mass of ruins of his house. He was about to turn away, but he thought again. "Perhaps there are survivors." He grabbed his gun, hid the wagon and made his way to his house. On the way his native servant leaped out of a bush with blood streaming from his head and said, 'Baas! Come quick missus is still alive and son is dying. Go! Quick!" "Come on," said Jan but he was just wasting his breath for his faithful native servant swayed, staggered and fell dead.

Jan took an unhappy glance at him and made for his house. Just as he entered a Kaffir raised his spear and threw it. He did not know where it landed, but he did not take notice as his life was at stake. He raised his gun and fired. In a moment there lay the Kaffir, dead as a stone. But this was not all, in a corner lay his beloved wife, Anna. In another Johann his son, but his daughter was no where to be seen. Suddenly he heard a low muffled groan, it was his son. He heard his son mutter, "She was captured." He then thumped on the ground and he was dead. Jan slammed the door closed and went outside. He saddled his horse and he left the house. What would he do now? In the back of his mind, the one word rang out "Revenge." "R.E.V.E.N.G.E."...

NOTE: Usage of the word kaffir in a modern South African context is a pejorative, as unacceptable today as its American counterpart.

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